Tree change just fine for Yoshifumi

APM general manager pulp Yoshi Horisaki was once a star of equestrian in Japan.
photograph anne simmons

APM general manager pulp Yoshi Horisaki was once a star of equestrian in Japan. photograph anne simmons

A representative from Australian Paper Maryvale's Japanese owner Nippon Paper Industries is awaiting a decision from headquarters on whether he will remain in his management and liaison role in pulp in the Latrobe Valley.

Yoshifumi Horisaki would miss the beautiful nature, friendly people, Gippsland's cool climate red wines, but not his job, he said jokingly.

His wife Kazumi joined him in Traralgon after two-and-a-half years on Australian soil and the pair have loved the experience.

As such an enthusiast for a nice drop of Victorian red, Mr Horisaki has volunteered his time in vineyards picking grapes each autumn.

"Every Wednesday [Kazumi] goes to the spinning wheel club located at the neighbourhood house," Mr Horisaki said.

Mr Horisaki was chosen by his employer to represent the company in Australia thanks to his superior English skills gained over 10 years in the United States learning the language and the Western-style for business.

He said it was commonplace for people in Japan to stick to the one company until retirement.

"Japan is very well organised – very different," Mr Horisaki said.

"If headquarters indicated to me to go back to Japan and restart a Japanese job it would be very difficult to adjust I think.

"Each business style has its own good things and bad things."

Mr Horisaki came from the capital city of Japan's northern island Hokkaido.

The general manager pulp entered the industry after studying pulp at university and becoming fascinated with the process at a chemical level.

"When I entered the pulping industry I learnt the quality of the paper," he said.

He said paper was like air because you could see it everywhere.

"Each paper has its own quality ... so it's very interesting, so I'm very proud of that," Mr Horisaki said.

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